AdultBook's blog

Live Your Best Midlife

With a message similar to that of Eckhart Tolle’s A New Earth and Miguel Ruiz’s The Four Agreements, Marianne Williamson’s The Age of Miracles: Embracing the New Midlife advocates for change from within, a spiritual and psychological personal awakening with the potential power to change the world. Williamson directs her message specifically toward those who have reached what society deems as middle age - mid-40s and beyond. Instead of slowing down, compromising, or giving up, Williamson says that this stage in life can be a rebirth, a time of change, a shifting of priorities, and a rejuvenation of the body and spirit if only we are open to new possibilities and perspectives.

Legendary Scottish History!

Lady Macbeth by Susan King
Lady Gruadh is the last heir in a royal Celtic family whose unwilling marriage to Macbeth, a warrior lord who killed her husband, will unite Scotland for the first time. Together they survive treacherous and violent politics to save the country they were both born to rule. A rich and dramatic historical novel!

A Year's Worth of French Cooking

Facing 30 and feeling that she didn't have much to show for it except an unrewarding secretarial job, Julie Powell decided she needed a project, something that would motivate, challenge, excite, and satisfy her. She found it in Julia Child's classic cookbook, Mastering the Art of French Cooking. With support from her husband, friends, and eventually her family, Powell gave herself a year to make every recipe in the cookbook. What began as a simple daily blog resulted in Julie & Julia: 365 days, 524 recipes, 1 tiny apartment kitchen. How Powell accomplished her goal and what she learned will inspire, amaze, and amuse even those with the most basic cooking skills. 

What Really Happens at Your Local Library

You'll view the public library in a whole new light after you read Free for All: Oddballs, Geeks, and Gangstas in the Public Library by Don Borchert. This memoir of an assistant librarian at a California library reveals, among other things, that sex offenders, drug dealers, and gang members are just as likely to roam the stacks as preschoolers, students, and senior citizens; that books are not the only items put in the book drops; and that even seemingly cheery, mild-mannered librarians have a breaking point. Often laugh-out-loud funny, occasionally poignant, and always entertaining, this book features a library that is a microcosm of public libraries around the nation.

An Exciting Equine Mystery

Dead Heat by Dick Francis Max Morton is a well-respected chef whose career is nearly ruined after a food poisoning incident and a bomb blast occur at two of his catering affairs. To salvage his restaurant business he sets out to discover who is behind these crimes that are somehow connected to the world of horseracing. He will need to protect himself and his loved ones before the truth is uncovered. A highly enjoyable read!

Arthur C Clarke, science fiction legend, dies at 90

SF legend Arthur C. Clarke has died in Sri Lanka at the age of 90.

 

Clarke was a visionary--credited with the idea of communications satellites--and deep sea explorer, but he recently said he would like to be remembered most as a Science Fiction writer.

 

To read the Associated Press obituary, click here.

Compelling and Tense Fiction!

The Painter of Battles By Arturo Perez-Reverte This latest novel from a popular Spanish author focuses on a world-weary war photographer who is now living in a tower off the coast of Spain. His solitary life is abruptly broken when a battle scarred soldier visits him. Together, they wrestle over issues of war, love, art, and revenge. A wonderfully written and contemporary read!

The role of chess in world culture

"The immortal game" was a casual game of chess played in London in 1851 between two chess tournament participants away from the competition, that become an historic match.

Eifelheim: A deep blend of Historical and Science Fiction

Eifelheim by Michael Flynn Tom is a cliologist, a mathematical historian (Flynn's own term, analogous to Asimov's "psychohistory"), struggling to understand why the German town of Eifelheim, abandoned during the Black Plague, was never resettled. Sharon, Tom's girlfriend and a physicist, drives him out of the apartment to the library so she can complete her own contemplations, which will prove paramount in resolving Tom's questions.

Chess and intrigue in pre-WWI Russia


Zugzwang: In chess, the state when a player is forced to make moves, but each move one makes only worsens one's predicament.

In St. Petersburg, in 1914, pscyhoanalyst Dr. Otto Spethmann finds himself a suspect in the murder. A widower, Dr. Spethmann is consumed with anxiety for his daughter, whose involvement with a victim makes her a target, as well.