Blogs

It's a Mystery 4/14/08

Mystery Readers' Resources

Where can a mystery reader go to find answers to questions, such as "What title is next in the Maisie Dobbs mystery series?  Who writes the mysteries featuring the character Jack Daniels?  Does my favorite author have a new mystery coming out soon?  What authors write police procedurals?"

There are a number of print and online resources that can answer these questions, as well as many others about the mystery genre.  One of my favorites is Stop, You're Killing Me!   (http://www.stopyourekillingme.com)  This website provides a wealth of information about mysteries, authors, series, and read-alikes.  The main search is by author or character and provides a link to the author's website (if available), a brief description of the series the author writes, and then lists the titles in chronological order.  There are also great links on the left side of the page - mysteries by location, occupation, historical time period, genres, read-alikes, etc.

An Exciting Equine Mystery

Dead Heat by Dick Francis Max Morton is a well-respected chef whose career is nearly ruined after a food poisoning incident and a bomb blast occur at two of his catering affairs. To salvage his restaurant business he sets out to discover who is behind these crimes that are somehow connected to the world of horseracing. He will need to protect himself and his loved ones before the truth is uncovered. A highly enjoyable read!

It's a Mystery 4/1/08

What Exactly is a Mystery?

The meanings of the terms Mystery, Suspense, and Thriller are often used interchangeably, but can also be confusing.  A helpful explanation comes from the Cluelass website:  http://cluelass.com.

    "There are no hard-and-fast rules, but Mystery and detective fiction emphasizes the puzzle aspect of the plot, with clues and "fair play" for the reader - i.e. the readers should be able to determine the solution at the same time as the protagonist.

Sites for Baby Boomers

PC Magazine has a great list, "Top 10 Sites for Baby Boomers".

There are sites focused on retirement, finding post-retirement employment, and aging; blogs: "boomergirl" and "I Remember JFK"; and online communities for boomers.

It's a Mystery

A Brief History of the Mystery

Welcome to the first posting of It's a Mystery.  For those of you who share an interest in reading mysteries, I hope to bring you information about the mystery genre, including trends, author information, news about forthcoming books and lots more.

A brief history of the mystery takes us back to ancient times when playwrights Sophocles and Euripides wove mysteries into their dramas.  But the man known as the "father of the mystery story" is Edgar Allan Poe, who introduced the first fiction detective, Auguste C. Dupin, in The Murders in the Rue Morgue in 1841.  Other writers who influenced Poe and the early mystery genre were Charles Dickens and Wilkie Collins.  The Leavenworth Case, penned by Anna Katherine Green in 1878, is the first mystery story written by a woman.

Arthur C Clarke, science fiction legend, dies at 90

SF legend Arthur C. Clarke has died in Sri Lanka at the age of 90.

 

Clarke was a visionary--credited with the idea of communications satellites--and deep sea explorer, but he recently said he would like to be remembered most as a Science Fiction writer.

 

To read the Associated Press obituary, click here.

Compelling and Tense Fiction!

The Painter of Battles By Arturo Perez-Reverte This latest novel from a popular Spanish author focuses on a world-weary war photographer who is now living in a tower off the coast of Spain. His solitary life is abruptly broken when a battle scarred soldier visits him. Together, they wrestle over issues of war, love, art, and revenge. A wonderfully written and contemporary read!

The role of chess in world culture

"The immortal game" was a casual game of chess played in London in 1851 between two chess tournament participants away from the competition, that become an historic match.

Get Ready for March Madness with Statsheet.com

College basketball fans are gearing up for the big tournament. A great site dedicated to college basketball is StatSheet.com. The site features rankings, news, stats, scores, and much more. You can get widgets to embed stats for a particular game in your blog, web page, etc.

Whether you're into March "bracketology" or just a rabid fan, this site will keep the basketball fan happy (until they're been knocked out of the office pool on the first day of the tournament).

Eifelheim: A deep blend of Historical and Science Fiction

Eifelheim by Michael Flynn Tom is a cliologist, a mathematical historian (Flynn's own term, analogous to Asimov's "psychohistory"), struggling to understand why the German town of Eifelheim, abandoned during the Black Plague, was never resettled. Sharon, Tom's girlfriend and a physicist, drives him out of the apartment to the library so she can complete her own contemplations, which will prove paramount in resolving Tom's questions.