Farnsworth's blog

Comic book legend Stan Lee dead at 95

Cover of Stan Lee by Bob BatchelorAmerican comic book writer Stan Lee was the human behind the superheroes. Many marvel at the man who gave his characters extraordinary powers and everyday headaches - a formula which revolutionized comics. The Hulk, Iron Man, Daredevil and the Fantastic Four all sprang from his fertile imagination and spilled onto the page. But while his career may have started in pen and ink, it grew and evolved into much more. From digital graphic novels to blockbuster Hollywood films; leading Marvel Comics from a small division of a publishing house to a large multimedia corporation; Stan Lee was prolific. And fans also delighted in seeing Lee's brief cameo appearances in almost every Marvel live-action movie.

It's Stranger Things Day — here's what that means and how to celebrate...

Cover of Stranger Things season 1On Nov 6, 1983 Will Byers went missing. On Stranger Things Day, we honor him by dressing up, eating eggos, sending memes, and watching and reading strang(er) things.

Celebrate the 80th anniversary of Orson Welles' 'The War of the Worlds' broadcast.

Orson Wells and the Mercury Theatre broadcasting War of the WorldsOn October 30, 1938 The Mercury Theatre on the Air radio show adapted H.G. Wells' 1898 novel The War of the Worlds, setting the story in the United States in 1938 and starting off the narrative as a musical show that turned into a dramatized news report about Martians invading earth.

Comics To Read Before They Are On the Big Screens

Don't sit down to watch the new comic book shows on television, or films in the theater, before first doing your homework! Read about the collected comics books that can prep you with all the background you need before streaming the latest blockbusters!

An Absolutely Remarkable Thing by Hank Green

In a world where everything is shared, anyone's life can completely change overnight.

The Carls just appeared.

Noted Sci-fi writer and Cleveland native Harlan Ellison (1934-2018)

The Top of the Volcano: stories by Harlan Ellison coverHarlan Ellison was an American writer, known for his prolific and influential work in New Wave speculative fiction, and for his outspoken, combative personality.

Harlan Ellison was born on May 27, 1934, in Cleveland. Growing up, partly in Painesville, Ohio he was bullied in school, largely for being Jewish. The experience made him feel like an outsider and fueled his anger, which he channeled into his writing. In 1949 and started the Cleveland Science Fiction Club, became a frequent moviegoer and worked as a runner for local mobsters, he told The Plain Dealer.

Human life is now just a matter of dollars and cents. Do you have a spare $84K? Then you are free to kill. 84K by Claire North

Cover of 84K by Claire NorthFirst we gave up a few human rights in the name of counter-terrorism.
Then the universities were closed for spreading warnings of impending calamity.
Finally the Company Men took over running the government & the media, as well as their businesses. Now it's all about the Benjamins.

Love Westworld? Try these...

Westworld just started season 2, continuing to explore what it means to be human through the eyes of the lifelike AI "hosts" in the park, the series investigates the boundaries of an exotic world set at the intersection of the near future and the re-imagined past. If you can't get enough of sentient robots getting angry revenge on their human creators, here are a few titles you might want to peruse.

Love with the proper amphibian.

Mrs. Caliban by Rachel IngallsLove affairs with creatures from black lagoons might be having a moment; Guillermo del Toro's film "The Shape of Water" features a green-scaled research subject paired with a mute lab worker. But before "The Shape of Water" there was MRS. CALIBAN.

RIP Ursula K. Le Guin

Cover of The Unreal and The Real Selected Stories of Ursula K. Le GuinUrsula K. Le Guin, one of science-fiction and fantasy’s greatest authors, has died at the age of 88.

Together with contemporaries like Philip K. Dick and Samuel R. Delany, Le Guin demonstrated that literate, moving stories could be told within the confines of genre, an important lesson for modern best-selling writers like Neil Gaiman and David Mitchell, who hailed her work.