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Adult Book Blog Staff book reviews, fiction and non-fiction.

The Couponing Librarian will teach you how to make a change for very little change by using coupons to get items at deep discounts or for free that you can donate to organizations that help others.

The Edge: A blog about Occult philosophy, depth psychology, ancient times, future times and the frontiers of science.

Farnsworth's blog features news and reviews in the world of sci-fi.

Internet Search and Web Tools and ebook technologies, brought to you by mrweaver.

It's a Mystery is a blog about the Mystery genre and its many subgenres.

Just the Facts. In Reference, we learn something new every day. What we find, we share with you.

Local History narrated by librarian Zac Springer

Music Musings on Monday features music news, releases, and everyday musings..

The Playful Parent - Make the most of your family time with ideas for activities and crafts that entertain and educate!

The Sports Section covers the world of sports, from alpine skiing to yachting.

Aging-Related Info on the Web: Ageline

Consumer Searches To Go is an information service of AARP. The site features categories of information with the general consumer in mind.

Categories include:
• Health
• Money
• Long-Term Care
• Retirement
And more.

For more specialized information on aging-related topics, try Ageline Search, which is geared more toward professionals than the general user.

Comparison: search engines, directories

Search engines come in many flavors, and offer different features. Which one is the best for you? The answer depends on your search.

This comparison chart showcases the different search functions of several search engines, definitions of terminology, and provides reviews.

Sometimes a great place to start a search is in a subject directory.

Betsey Crocker

Betsey Crocker was the first school teacher in Dover Township, Ohio. Betsey taught in a log schoolhouse on the lake shore in 1816. The school stood five “rods” from Lake Erie on the north side of Lake Road, a 36 foot square building, never painted, and without the benefit of a fence surrounding it. A 20 foot woodshed was attached to the school’s east side. Rows of seats lined the west, north and east walls inside the school building.

New Picture Books 3/6/07

The Youth Services Department recently received a variety of new picture books and we would like to share a few.

COWLICK! by Christin Ditchfield
This is a must read for anyone who has that one clump of hair that just won't lay down. It tells the story of how two little boys get cowlicks in their hair as they sleep.

NOT A BOX by Antoinette Portis
This title is a 2007 Geisel Award Honor Book.

Need help with a Web search? AskScott.com

From the Website: "AskScott.com helps you find the most appropriate Internet reference tool for your search."

The site features search tools and databases for several categories of information, including:

  • Family Issues
  • News or stocks
  • Research Assistance
  • Government Information
  • International Information

Two books for winter reading

Foreign Correspondent
by Alan Furst, 2006

Carlo Weisz is an Italian journalist seeking refuge in Paris with other intellectuals fleeing Mussolini's fascist government. While working as a foreign correspondent for Reuters, he becomes the editor of an underground newspaper that hopes to keep the flames of resistance alive in both countries. His efforts not only place his own life in danger, but that of the German socialite and lover he is trying to save from the Nazis. This latest espionage novel by the author of Dark Voyage and Red Gold is once again filled with atmosphere, intrigue, and romance.

"The Cow Shed"

In 1852 John Wilson, a graduate of Oberlin College, founded the Dover Academy as a private school for Dover Village scholars who wished an education above the eighth grade. Wilson's Academy was located about 50 feet south of where the Red Brick building now stands. Mr. Wilson retired in 1860, and since the school could not compete with free public education, it was abandoned in 1862.
In 1898 the Academy began to function as the Dover Public High School. Classes were held in one large room with four grades and two teachers. The first few classes graduated in a three year program.

Daylight Saving Time another Y2K?

There is a significant change this year in the beginning and ending times for Daylight Saving Time (DST) in the U.S. This may also affect your computer! While not expected to be as big a problem as the turn of the century "Y2K Bug," computer users may be perplexed or inconvenienced by the DST issue.

The U.S. Energy Policy Act of 2005, passed by the U.S. Congress, extended DST in the U.S. by approximately four weeks. As a result, beginning in this year, DST will start three weeks earlier --on March 11, 2007-- and end one week later --on November 4, 2007-- resulting in a new DST period that is four weeks longer than previously observed.

What's Now? 10x10

Once in a while we happen across a Web site that offers a new perspective on our world. Ten by Ten is one of those sites.

The creators of 10x10 explain their creation better than I can, "10x10â„¢ ('ten by ten') is an interactive exploration of the words and pictures that define the time. The result is an often moving, sometimes shocking, occasionally frivolous, but always fitting snapshot of our world. Every hour, 10x10 collects the 100 words and pictures that matter most on a global scale, and presents them as a single image, taken to encapsulate that moment in time. Over the course of days, months, and years, 10x10 leaves a trail of these hourly statements which, stitched together side by side, form a continuous patchwork tapestry of human life."

Visit 10x10 now.

Dig to China?

Did you ever hear the old expression about digging a hole so deep you wind up in China? If you could dig all the way straight through the center of the Earth... where would you really wind up?

To answer that burning question, some folks have created a Web site that lets you select a place anywhere on the face of the Earth for digging. Double-click on the map at that point and click "Dig Here." The site will then show you where you'd wind up if you could dig straight on through.