Daylight Saving Time another Y2K?

There is a significant change this year in the beginning and ending times for Daylight Saving Time (DST) in the U.S. This may also affect your computer! While not expected to be as big a problem as the turn of the century "Y2K Bug," computer users may be perplexed or inconvenienced by the DST issue.

The U.S. Energy Policy Act of 2005, passed by the U.S. Congress, extended DST in the U.S. by approximately four weeks. As a result, beginning in this year, DST will start three weeks earlier --on March 11, 2007-- and end one week later --on November 4, 2007-- resulting in a new DST period that is four weeks longer than previously observed.

Computers have built-in settings that automatically adjust the system clock for DST. If those settings are not adjusted to accommodate the new DST dates, the computer system clock will not be correctly changed. Time-critical operations may not function as expected if the system clock is "off" because of the time change.

Visit Microsoft for Windows help.

Apple users should check Apple documentation and possibly update their OS as should Linux users. Certain time-sensitive applications (Outlook, Entorage, etc.) may also need updating or patching.

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